What’s in a Title – Rally

| April 5, 2014 | 0 Comments
Share Button

 

Marilyn Parker competing in Rally Competition at the LRC National Specialty

Marilyn Parker competing in Rally Competition at the 2013 LRC National Specialty

Related Articles
What’s in a Title – Conformation
What’s in a Title – Australian Conformation
What’s in a Title – Obedience
What’s in a Title – Canine Good Citizen
What’s In A Title – Hunt 
What’s in a Title – Agility

Introduction
This is a part of a series explaining various types of competition and how to obtain various titles in conformation, hunt, obedience, agility, tracking, etc. Check out the Related Articles section for other titles. This article is an introduction to the types of Rally titles that exist and how to achieve them. It will also help you understand what those letters mean at the end of a dog’s AKC name. It is by no means comprehensive, just enough to whet your appetite and encourage you to get out with your dog and compete. For Rally rules and regulations, please visit the American Kennel Club (AKC) web site.

Rally provides a great introduction to the four AKC Companion Events which were developed to demonstrate the bond between a well-trained dog and its owner; other events are Obedience, Tracking, and Agility. Rally was designed with the traditional pet owner in mind yet has various levels of competition for those up to the challenge. It was developed after the rally-style auto racing; the course includes 10 – 20 stations which are scored (less rigorously as traditional obedience) as well as the overall time to complete is captured in the event of a tie. Rally is something you might build upon successful completion of the Canine Good Citizen (CGC).

AKC Rally Titles
Eligibility: AKC Rally events are open to all dogs that either have their AKC Registration or belong to these programs: Purebred Alternative Listing/Indefinite Listing Privilege (PAL/ILP) or AKC Canine Partners Program (mixed breeds or dogs ineligible for AKC registration). If the dog is in the latter two programs, they must be spayed or neutered in order to participate.

The following titles are offered by AKC:
• Rally Novice (RN) – for the beginner. The dog is on leash for the full course. The course has 10 – 15 stations (minimum 3, maximum 5 stationary exercises). The handler can pat their leg, clap their hands, and offer verbal encouragement but cannot touch the dog.
• Rally Advanced (RA) – for the dog that has completed the Novice level. The dog enters and leaves the ring on leash yet all exercises are judged off leash. The course has 12 – 17 stations (minimum 3, maximum 7 stationary exercises), a minimum of 3 Advanced level stations plus one required jump. The handler can pat their leg, clap their hands, and offer verbal encouragement but cannot touch the dog.
• Rally Excellent (RE) – for the dog that has completed the Advanced level. The dog enters and leaves the ring on leash yet all exercises are judged off leash. The course has 15 – 20 stations (minimum 3, maximum 7 stationary exercises), a minimum of 2 Advanced level stations, minimum of 3 excellent level stations, plus two required jumps and the Sit Stay exercise. Handlers can use verbal encouragement, multiple commands or inaudible signals using one or both arms and hands, but are not allowed to clap their hands or pat their legs or touch their dog at any time.
• Rally Advanced Excellent (RAE) – for the dog that has completed the Excellent level. The dog enters and leaves the ring on leash yet all exercises are judged off leash. The dog must receive qualifying scores in both Advanced B and Excellent B at 10 separate licensed or member Rally events. When the RAE title has a numeric designation, it indicates the number of times the dog has met RAE requirements (e.g., RAE2, RAE3, etc.)

Note: A vs B Classes. I was confused on which to enter when I started Rally so I’ll try to demystify it for you. You should enter the following class if you meet the following criteria and never enter both A and B classes at any one event.
• A Class – you own the dog or are a member of the owner’s household or you have NEVER won the Rally title that you’re competing for or have NEVER obtained any Obedience title with any dog. Note: after you win a Rally title, you can continue to compete in the A Class for 60 days.
• B Class – you do not have to own the dog (but can) or you HAVE won the Rally title that you’re competing for or you HAVE obtained any Obedience title with any dog

Qualifying Criteria: Each dog must earn qualifying scores from three independent judges. Qualifying scores are achieving a minimum of 70 (100 is perfect score) navigating a specified number of obstacles after penalties and faults are applied. Scoring is based on minor to substantial deductions ranging from 1-10 points per station. Retries of a station are an automatic 3-point deduction and any incorrectly performed stations are an automatic 10-point deduction.

Example stations:

  •   Halt – Sit. Halt your dog in heel position.
  •   360 Degree Right Turn. While heeling, the team makes a 360 degree turn to the handler’s right.
  •   Left Turn. 90 degree turn to the left.
  •   Fast Pace. Dog and handler must speed up noticeably.
  •   Down and Stop. While moving with the dog in heel position, the handler commands the dog to down as the handler comes to a stop next to the dog.

An annual National Rally Championship event is held typically in March at a different location each year; it is held in conjunction with the National Agility and National Obedience Championship events. The qualification period is typically December 1st of the previous year through November 30th of the current year. Entries are limited.

You are eligible for the following if you have:

Novice

  • Earned the RN title during the qualifying period
  • Earned 3 scores of 90 or more from the RN classes during the qualifying period

Advanced

  • Earned the RA title during the qualifying period
  • Earned 3 scores of 90 or more from the RA classes during the qualifying period

Excellent

  •  Earned the RE title during the qualifying period
  •  Earned 3 scores of 90 or more from the RE classes during the qualifying period

RAE

  •  Earned the RAE title during the qualifying period
  •  Earned 3 scores of 100 from the RA or RE classes during the qualifying period
  •  Earned at least 5 double qualifying scores from the Advanced B and Excellent B during the qualifying period

Get Ready

Rally is a great way to bond with your dog and take its training to the next level. It’s fun for both you and the dog and you can make it as competitive as you want. Visit the AKC web site to learn more about the signs and the course, find a local training facility who will help you get ready, purchase flashcards and/or signs from Retriever Life (send an email to misha@retrieverlife.com) to practice on your own, then sign up for an event! Sometimes there are fun matches that can help you get a good feel of what to expect as well – check with your local breed associations. We hope this has sparked your interest to go out and have more fun with your dog!

Category : What's In A Title

Lorraine

About the Author ()

Lorraine has owned Labradors for over 20 years and has bred them about half that time. A good day for Lorraine is experiencing the unbridled joy of her labs greeting her (in the morning, after work, or even after a short trip to the store), witnessing the pure happiness of her labs in the field retrieving or exploring on a hike, and snuggling with (or under) them on the couch at night. A great day is a good day (just described) plus having a litter of puppies around!

Leave a Reply

*